Adding value to your property: How can a bridge to term product help you? 

What an amazing week we’ve had – we are still flying high from Wednesday night!! Roll on Sunday now…

This week I want to talk about bridge to term products specifically. Last week we covered bridging and why it is so important to add value to your property, but there is more to it – and there are ways to reduce your overall cost and this is a big one!

What is bridge to term? 

It is a product which allows you to use the same lender for the bridge to purchase the property and then use it as an exit onto a term mortgage as well.

How does it work? 

There are two types:

  • You can have it as ONE product, which means that you have two offers at the beginning (one for the bridge and one for the term) and the valuation with cover both products too, so you have certainly over the end value and what you can work towards.
  • You can have it as 2 products, so you apply for them separately and have two valuations and offers (the term gets started once works have been finished). This allows a valuation to take place once works are completed so you often get a more favourable figure, it can also take into consideration the finished property, which really can help. As with the same lender it has the advantage of lower arrangement and legal fees.

What are differences between this and a standard bridge?

From a cost point of view, you can save on valuation costs (in some instances), legal fees and arrangement fees. This will help to reduce your finance costs and increase your ROI. As bridging can be very expensive, this is a good way to bring it down.

It also offers you some certainty around the exit for your bridge. The lender will underwrite the case for the exit as well as your initial loan, so any issues with the property should be picked up on before you buy the property. There’s never a guarantee with these things, but it does mitigate some of the risk.

How much can I borrow and what works can be carried out? 

This depends on the type of product.

We have a lender who will look at both parts as one product, as mentioned earlier. This is ideal for light refurbishments before letting out as a single let. For example where the EPC isn’t good enough, or it needs a new kitchen or bathroom. We will know the end value from the schedule of works and the valuer will confirm this. You can borrow up to 65% for the purchase, and then 75% for the refinance. This is a low cost option and offers some security but does mean you are putting more in up front.  The 2nd valuation is only a revisit, to confirm the works have finished – it cannot change the GDV. You have to complete and refinance by 6 months maximum.

For more complex refurbishments, ie conversions from commercial to residential or to HMOs we have another product. This is set up as two products, a bridge to start and moving to a term facility when it’s finished.  The initial valuation will include GDV expectations from the valuer. For light refurbishment projects we can lend up to 85% of the purchase price (subject to some restrictions) and for heavy refurbishments we can go up to 75%. Heavy refurbishment would also include anything requiring planning or building regulations. You also have up to 18 months to do the works.

For the term exit we can generally lend up to 75% of the new value.

For both options we do not need to wait 6 months from the purchase.

As always, give me a call to discuss individual cases and how we can make it work. Have a fantastic weekend and come on England!

Thinking outside the box: where can your deposit come from?

In this current market, we really have a big split in the situation of our clients. On one hand we seem to have plenty with cash available to purchase property and then refinance once works are completed. On the other, however, we have so many people trying to get into the property market but struggling to find the deposit funds.

Before I get to the options, one thing that comes up often is how much money you need to prove and whether credit cards can be used.

You need to be able to show the lender where the deposit is coming from (and it needs to be in your bank account!), as well as any refurbishment costs. This will need to match your schedule of works, and a valuer needs to agree that they schedule and cost match the works needed in the property. For example, if there’s clear evidence of damp then the solution needs to be covered off in your schedule.

How can you use credit cards within this? 

I hear property mentors often speak about using credit cards to pay for refurbishments so that you can refinance and pay it back without putting your own money in but to be honest it doesn’t always work that way! Lenders will want to know that you have the funds to carry out the refurbishment – if you’re not able to finish it then they will be the ones left with it and that’s not what they want!

As with lots of things though, it does come down to experience. If you’ve done it a few times before and got off your bridge successfully then they are more likely to be more flexible with where your money is coming from and we may be able to agree it.

Here’s some ideas for where your funds can come from 

Savings 

This is the easiest one, but often the one that gets used up first! If you’re serious about getting into property then you really do need to think about how you can save money from your day to day expenses to creat funds for it. Especially for your first project when the lender wants to see you’re using your own funds. Look at a budget planner, find a savings account that encourages monthly savings and go from there. There may be some sacrifices that need to be made!!

Refinance of your residential or other property

Refinancing your residential property can be seen as risky by some, but you are moving the equity from one property to another. With residential mortgages back up to higher loan to values and lenders now using bonus and commission again this may be a good time to look at this option.

Remember that your home may be at risk if you do not keep up repayments on it, so look at the overall picture. It’s an idea to explore though.

Gifts

Often when investors are looking for investor funds, family and friends are first on the list. It’s an easier sell, but comes with more pressure! Gifts from family are easier to use for your first few projects (before you build up some experience) and it counts as your own money!

Joint ventures 

This is an alternative where you are relying on the experience of someone else. It means your JV partner has more security over their funds and equally you have more support on the project. You are able to split the shareholding to reflect the funds and experience of all applicants too, so it’s flexible.

One thing to remember is that generally all applicants to the mortgage will need to sign a personal guarantee to be jointly and severally responsible for the loan, so ensure that your JV partner is happy with that set up.

Company loans 

Something we are seeing more of, is where clients have a (non- property) company which is profitable and they want to use these funds to put into property. It is a tax efficient way of doing things, but ensure to check with your accountant. You may have utilised a BBL in the company too, so you will be able to use that. Most lenders will allow you to use company loans as long as they are interest bearing.

Angel investments

Once you’ve built up a track record of projects – usually one or two similar sized projects – you can move on to using other people’s funds!

Loans are an option where you run out of your own money, when you factor in the overall costs. Most lenders will now be able to use investor loans where there is a loan agreement in place and no charge on the security property. There needs to be a clear replacement method and any interest payments need to be taken into account so bear that in mind.

With the right strategy you will be able to recycle some of your funds, so you’re not starting from scratch with each project – although ‘no money left’ deals are hard to come across at the moment!

As always, let us know if you want to run anything past us!